ETF Trends
ETF Trends

Now it’s time for the flip-side: What exchange traded funds (ETFs) stand to gain from a Democrat (that will be either Barack Obama or Hillary Clinton at this point) occupying the White House?

If Obama wins, says Kevin Baker for The Street, his website calls for $150 billion over ten years to be invested in clean energy technologies. He wants advances in biofuels, plug-in hybrids and an increase in the research of solar and wind power.

Clinton also has marked clean energy as a priority. She wants to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 80% and cut foreign oil imports, and like Obama, she wants to increase the investment in energy research and development.

With priorities like those, a fund such as the PowerShares WilderHill Clean Energy Portfolio (PBW) could almost certainly benefit. One-third of the ETF is invested in alternative-energy stocks. Market Vectors Global Alternative Energy (GEX) might benefit in a Democratic administration, as well.

Another centerpiece of both the Clinton and Obama campaigns is health care reform. Obama wants to force price cuts in the industry, but without mandating that everyone be covered. Clinton, on the other hand, wants every man, woman and child insured.

The iShares Dow Jones US Insurance Index Fund (IAK) might do well in a Clinton White House, but fare poorly in an Obama one.

If Clinton is the nominee, the Consumer Discretionary Select Sector SPDR (XLY) could be worth a look. That’s because her nomination could inspire Republicans to dig deep and donate big toward political commercials. Almost a third of the fund is invested in media companies.

Another fund worth a look if Obama wins the White House is the PowerShares Dynamic Building & Construction (PKB). His plan calls for more spending on roads, bridges and schools. Since this fund is 30% allocated in engineering and construction, it could reap the rewards.

The opinions and forecasts expressed herein are solely those of Tom Lydon, and may not actually come to pass. Information on this site should not be used or construed as an offer to sell, a solicitation of an offer to buy, or a recommendation for any product.