ETF Trends
ETF Trends

According to a study by LPL Financial, the “smart money” may be exiting equities. Hedge funds, institutions, insiders and foreigners were net sellers of stock in June. The net buyers? Individuals and corporations. The brokerage firm’s chief market strategist, Jeffrey Kleintop, further explained that companies buying back shares of their own stock accounted for most of the purchasing activity.

Corporate buybacks are hardly a new phenomenon. Rather than hold too much cash on their books, companies often invest in their own shares if they believe that their stock is undervalued. That’s the positive spin. The more cynical narration is that corporations artificially support stock prices as well as massage the perception of how profitable they are. In essence, when a company reduces the total number of outstanding shares by purchasing them, profits per share move higher; market participant perception can be “goosed” even if total earnings have flatlined.

Considering the fact that pensions, insurers, hedge funds, large money managers, insiders were net sellers in June — every grouping other than individuals and the corporations — it stands to reason that individuals are the only market participants who believe the earnings story. In other words, most seem to conclude that companies are not repurchasing shares because they feel that respective stock prices are undervalued; rather, most players feel that current corporate buybacks are a mechanism of manipulation.

It may be hard to argue otherwise. According to Birinyi Associates, companies spent roughly $600 billion in buybacks in 2013. That marked the second highest calendar year of corporate allocation to stock in history. What’s more, the buyback craze has maintained a torrid pace here in 2014. Interestingly enough, the largest annual amount spent in history came in 2007, right before the onset of the recession and the subsequent collapse of the financial system.

What has been missing in the discussion of buybacks is where the corporate cash is not going. Specifically, if companies really felt good about the prospects of the globally interconnected economy, we might expect them to invest more heavily in new product development, human resources, marketing and a variety of aggressive efforts to expand.

Naturally, ETF enthusiasts may wish to know if there’s a way to capitalize on a market that is still trending higher, in spite of net selling by larger groupings. Possibly. PowerShares Buyback Achievers (PKW) handily outperformed the S&P 500 SPDR Trust (SPY) over the prior 3 years. It should be noted, though, that virtually all of the excess gains came during the 2013 year when corporate buybacks were particularly robust.

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