ETF Trends
ETF Trends
       

       

            ProFunds Gains SEC Approval for ETFs       

Ignites article published on May 24, 2006
                    By Tom Leswing
            

   

    ProFunds has won long-awaited approval of its proposed leveraged exchange-traded funds.

In
doing so, the shop has become the first firm to gain approval to launch
ETFs that use leverage to exceed positive and negative returns of
indexes. In addition, it is the first shop to gain approval of ETFs
that are structured to perform the opposite of specified indexes.

ETF trackers, meanwhile, say the funds should appeal to a variety of
different types of investors. In that regard, they should prove to be
popular, says Tom Lydon, president of Global Trends Investments.

“Leveraged mutual funds have been very popular,” he says. “And that popularity should transcend to ETFs.”

He points out that firms that offer leveraged mutual funds such as ProFunds, Rydex and Direxion
(formerly Potomac) have enjoyed steady fund sales. That’s been driven,
in part, by investors’ beliefs that the equity markets will gain only
modest returns. Investing in funds that seek to earn one and a half or
twice the returns of an index is one way to rev up returns, he adds.

At
the same time, the market has been moving upward over the past few
years, so some investors may be expecting a market decline, or
correction. Those investors may be attracted to ProFund’s bearish ETFs.

“They
will appeal to investors expecting a market correction,” Lydon says.
“The timing for ProFunds may be quite right for them.”

The opinions and forecasts expressed herein are solely those of Tom Lydon, and may not actually come to pass. Mr. Lydon serves as an independent trustee of certain mutual funds and ETFs that are managed by Guggenheim Investments; however, any opinions or forecasts expressed herein are solely those of Mr. Lydon and not those of Guggenheim Funds, Guggenheim Investments, Guggenheim Specialized Products, LLC or any of their affiliates. Information on this site should not be used or construed as an offer to sell, a solicitation of an offer to buy, or a recommendation for any product.