Several months ago in November 2017 General Electric stock (GE) was trading at about $18 per share. I wrote an article at the time warning investors that it was likely for GE to continue falling to new lows before it found a bottom.

Fast forward to the end of March and the stock has indeed fallen to less than $13 per share. Ouch. Recently, GE was at its lowest point since July 2009 during the depth of the last financial crisis.

General Electric Performing Worse Than Ever

One reason for the drop was because the company had just cut its dividend by half. This took the dividend yield from 5% down to 2.5%. But the dividend slashing was necessary because the payout ratio in terms of dividend to free cash flow (FCF) was over 100% before. After the cut the dividend/FCF is 60% to 70%. The company needed to align its dividend payment with cash flow generation in order for its operations to stay sustainable.

Another change at GE is it’s shrinking its board of directors from 18 members to just 12. Flannery intends to refocus the industrial conglomerate’s sprawling businesses on just three arms eventually – health care, aviation and energy.

Several months ago in November 2017 General Electric stock (GE) was trading at about $18 per share. I wrote an article at the time warning investors that it was likely for GE to continue falling to new lows before it found a bottom.

Related: Dow ETFs Could Lose General Electric

Fast forward to the end of March and the stock has indeed fallen to less than $13 per share. Ouch. Last week GE was at its lowest point since July 2009 during the depth of the last financial crisis. One reason for the drop was because the company had just cut its dividend by half. This took the dividend yield from 5% down to 2.5%. But the dividend slashing was necessary because the payout ratio in terms of dividend to free cash flow (FCF) was over 100% before.

After the cut the dividend/FCF is 60% to 70%. The company needed to align its dividend payment with cash flow generation in order for its operations to stay sustainable. Another change at GE is it’s shrinking its board of directors from 18 members to just 12. Flannery intends to refocus the industrial conglomerate’s sprawling businesses on just three arms eventually – health care, aviation and energy.

GE shares have been underpeforming the markets for many years now. It fell 42% last year, and so far in 2018 it is down about 25%. Part of the issue is its involvement in two ongoing federal investigations – the SEC investigation into GE’s accounting practices and the U.S. Justice Department investigation in connection with subprime mortgages.