If you’re a financial advisor looking to expand your practice, you know all too well that the process of buying (or selling) another practice hasn’t been so simple in our own industry. That may be because maintaining a book of business is often not as difficult as building it in the first place. Many older advisors therefore can keep their doors open longer and, in some cases, simply lighten the load over time to create a “lifestyle practice.” That allows the advisor to delay retirement indefinitely, and it keeps their clients happy as well. This reality has made it a challenge for advisors who want to expand their own practices by purchasing another firm. Companies like FP Transitions and Succession Link who specialize in bringing the buyers and sellers of advisory firms have reported that for every seller on their sites, they have between 30 and 50 potential buyers. That’s a lot of competition!

The good news: the game may have shifted entirely with the announcement of the final DOL fiduciary rule. By April 2017, advisors must comply with the new rule that includes changes to producer compensation, products, and compliance. Advisors who operate commission-based practices are facing a transition—and for those one-third of advisors who are nearing retirement, it just may not be worth the trouble.

That’s great news if you’ve been thinking about expanding your own practice. Thanks to the DOL, the number of ‘for sale’ signs on advisory practices is likely to escalate in the next 12 months, and for the first time in ages, there may be more sellers than buyers. If you’re ready to consider the opportunity, here are five things to keep in mind:

1. Choose a firm with similar values.

Taking on a practice is a complex, “Brady Bunch” challenge. Take the time to be sure your philosophy and culture are aligned. If your focus is financial planning, an investment-focused firm won’t be a natural fit. The same is true for active versus passive investment styles. From a team perspective, synergy with your own team will go a long way to reduce integration pains. The same goes for the clients. Some advisor’s clients might be used to “kitchen table” meetings versus having to come to your office, some may prefer a more formal setting, and some may prefer a more “robo” approach. Think through which differences you can live with—and which you can’t (or shouldn’t).

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